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How To Conquer Procrastination Once And For All – Part II by Rowena List of Getting It Together

Procrastination is the intentional and continual postponement of a task that should be done now. Chronic procrastinators can have a negative impact on productivity not only their own but within a corporation.

Do you put off important tasks?

Is the stress of procrastinating getting to you?

Check out this short video and then read on for Getting It Togethers’ Top 5 Tips on How To Conquer Procrastination Once And For All – Part II.

Tip 1: Make a list of all the things you have been procrastinating about. Beside each item estimate how long each task will take. Break the tasks into bite-size pieces and then schedule time in your calendar to work on these tasks. The way to work around procrastination is if you treat these task as though they are equally as important as seeing your dentist or medical specialist.

Tip 2: Get help. You don’t have to do everything yourself. What tasks can you delegate? For example, doing your taxes.

Tip 3: Eliminate perfectionism. Recognize that good is good enough and that it’s better to get it done then to delay until it can be perfect. Let’s face it, nothing is perfect, no one is perfect and life certainly is not perfect. Don’t put yourself on a guilt trip if you do procrastinate once in a while. After all, you’re not perfect.

Tip 4: List the advantages of doing the task and compare them with the consequences of not doing it. This should help light a fire under you to stop procrastinating once and for all.

Tip 5: Don’t wait until you have more time; you will probably have no more time in the future than you have right now. Have you ever talked to someone who has retired? They always wonder how they ever had time to work. We all have the same 24 hours in a day, it’s how we spend them that counts. Procrastination is the thief of time. Don’t let it rob you of your precious moments. IMG_4999

PS: If you didn’t get a chance to read part 1, grab a coffee and read it here

Downsizing Made Simple by: Rowena List of Getting It Together

Are you; or someone you know getting ready to downsize?

Has the house been a museum for 30, 40, 50 years?

Are you wondering where to start?

Start by having these items on hand:

  • Boxes
  • Packing tape
  • Black marker
  • Labels
  • Industrial strength garbage bags
  • Scissors
  • Gloves (for cleaning and for areas such as the garage and crawl space)
  • Cleaning supplies

Check out this short video and then read on for Getting It Together’s Top 5 Tips to Downsizing Made Simple:

Tip 1: Have an action plan. If you’re a homeowner, first select the date you want to list your home. These tips work well even if you’re not selling but want to downsize the number of items you have in your current space.

The key part to this action plan is a master to do list. What services might you need to hire out? Will you need IMG_4738professional movers, packers, cleaners and of course the most important person…. your professional organizer?

Tip 2: Check the layout of your new place if at all possible. Knowing this information is extremely helpful when it comes time to dealing with furniture that may or may not fit into your new place. It’s also helpful to know the size of your new kitchen, bathroom and your closet space so you only take items that you will use, items that you love and, of course, the items that you really need.

Find out if getting closet/cupboard organizers installed before you move into your new place will help to maximize your storage space, e.g. Pull-outs in the kitchen cupboards and/or built in closet organizers.

Tip 3: Take it slow. You may be moving from your family home which you have lived in for decades. There’re a lot of memories in your home and downsizing may bring up some emotions.

I highly recommend the “15 minute- to- freedom” downsizing method. It means setting your timer for 15 minutes and going through one drawer at a time or one cupboard at a time. Take another 15 minutes and look at downsizing your purses or shoes. This method can be used throughout the entire house as long as you’re not on a tight timeline.

Tip 4: Make a list of items that need to be sold and a list of the items that will be given to family members and which ones will be donated. I suggest using bright coloured labels. Use bright green for all the items that are going to be sold. Simply stick the label onto those items and label them as “Sell”IMG_4737

Use bright yellow labels for the ones that will be donated and red ones for the ones that are going to family members. Do you have family heirlooms? If so, leave any special instructions with them. One of my clients had shelves of binders full of their family history. When downsizing they requested, I take the binders to the local Genealogy Society.

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the volume of stuff? This is where Rowena can really come in handy as she knows all the resources and best places for your previously loved items to go.

Tip 5: Visualize what you will be doing in your new space. Will you still host the monthly bridge club, have small dinner parties, or would you rather be going to other people’s places for such things? Knowing this information will help you determine what items are necessary for you to bring to your new space.

Eliminate the three deadly words “just in case”. Downsizing requires ruthlessness. If you’re feeling stuck with a particular item simply ask yourself “would I replace this if it were lost in a flood or fire?”

www.gettingittogether.ca

Estate Planning Made Simple

Personal estate organizing starts at the time we become an adult. Even if you think you have nothing of value there is still the question of your final wishes. Even if you think you have nothing there is still your bank account or your possible employment benefits etc.

We all know there is no escaping death, however we believe it will never happen to us. When we hear of a famous person’s demise we are usually in disbelief thinking that somehow they are exempt from death. And when it is a person close to us we go into shock, grief and sadness.

This is all real but somehow feels surreal.

Talking about death and dying does not mean it will come sooner. So why is it that we avoid the topic?

There are so many easy ways to be organized for your passing. This in turn will lessen the burden on your friends and family.

Imagine transitioning with grace.

Check out this short video on estate planning made simple and then read on for the Getting It Togethers Top 5 Tips.

Tip 1: Have a secure place for all of your digital passwords. Even if you use an online service like www.onepassword.com your loved ones still need to know how to get into that site.

Keep a copy in your safety deposit box.

Survivors need access to

  • Cell phone
  • Computer
  • Social media accounts
  • Home alarm with instructions on how to work it and the pass code.
  • Hidden spare keys and list of people who might have spare key to your home or vacation property.
  • Bank Accounts
  • Online accounts like banking, direct deposits, PayPal etc

Tip 2: Our stuff is less important to others. Are you saving stuff for your grown children? Do you even know if they want it or not?

I have heard of people having a family dinner where each person can claim certain heirlooms by placing a sticker on the bottom of the item with their name on it.

Or you might have special pieces of jewelry that you want to go to certain people which you will make note of in your will.

More has lost its appeal.

Less represents freedom.

Tip 3: Making special requests for your remains. Do your family members really know your final wishes?

Does everyone agree on them?

It is so important to have this in writing.

Advanced Planning- non legal organizing

  • Funeral, memorial service, celebration of life
  • Organ donation plan
  • Cremation or burial
  • Obituary ( be very careful about identity theft when publishing)
  • Eulogy
  • Asset Distribution
  • Estate Directory – friends, family ( have an up to date list of all their names and numbers)
  • List of Doctors, lawyers, financial planner, minister, accountant, insurance agent, employer, godparents, neighbours, kids school, babysitter, and daycare. Be sure to update these lists as things change in your life. I suggest reviewing this information once a year.
  • phone company
  • banks
  • credit card companies
  • volunteer organizations you belong to
  • Safety deposit box (with location of key) one way to insure smooth sailing is to have your bank acct and safety deposit box in joint name with one of your survivors.
  • Anything else you can think of that your survivors would need access to. Like passport, birth certificate and SIN # etc

Tip 4: Legal Essentials

  • Will
  • Power of Attorney
  • Representation Agreement ( living will)
  • Cash/life insurance, all financial documents
  • Business Succession Plan (if you own your own business) listing names of employees and their numbers, any contract workers or suppliers.
  • Any outstanding loans/alimony/child support

Tip 5: In order to process a registration of death for vital statistics and to process a death certificate, the funeral home will need the following

  • The deceased persons full legal name including maiden name if female
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Birthplace
  • Social insurance number
  • Health care number
  • Fathers full name
  • Mothers full name
  • Full name of surviving spouse
  • Occupation and for how long
  • Religious affiliation
  • Was the deceased a military veteran? This is important to have this information on file.

I am wishing all of my readers a long, happy, healthy, successful life.

When you do pass on, where will your affairs lie in the spectrum between chaos and order?

Please let me help you and your loved ones by making this transition smooth.

PS: Contact me today for a free 15 minute phone consultant on estate organizing. I’ll share with you your first next step.